Story of the Earth (rendered by a geologist)

When Time is young and a day spans six hours
I see the moon ever so often. Dizzy with the
spectacular sunrise I write a poem, six couplets
three written in daylight three in candlelight.

Volcano hisses islands away, waves fill craters
left by raining debris. When ash covers the sky
I dig scrawny seeds that refuse to sprout, feed on
sooty weeds, happy for these that nourish me.

Drops of water in the lake, spikes of gold on rocks
stretch marks on my thighs are from a star exploding
in emptiness. The dying fire impregnates me
air condenses in a cool embrace to quake my thirst.

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Labyrinth and Maze

magalithic

The labyrinth has one pathway.
The maze has multiple pathways intended to puzzle.

I climb the hills of Aravalli
as they roll into the sky
leave you on the cusp of two seas
thinking there is a lifetime
through the labyrinthine pathway
marked by stones two thousand years ago
that an old shepherd guards
as he watches time funnel through
the womb of the earth in a conception
larger than the union of two individuals.

The maze of tributaries
loops back in time to an evening
when the child in a womb listens
to the story of battles and treacheries
map of victory furrows the ground
as the garment
of the slumberous mother
cascades in the gentle breeze
like dunes in the desert
Sleep is the sister of death.

Photo: A rare circular labyrinth, about 2,500 years old,  discovered at Kundhukottai, a remote village 55 km from Hosur, Tamilnadu.

Gomti and Sarayu

Sarayu

The two rivers meet in the town
where the mountain spreads legs
for the valley that is prone on her back
like a slumberous woman.

Gomti flows into Sarayu
ceases to exist after the convergence.
In a statement of finality the river ends
as individual lives terminate.

The old temple priest would not let me step
into Gomti, pick a pebble from a tumble
of moss. My ashes will be strewn here,
he said pointing to the stony riverbed.

His eyes rested on Sarayu’s mercurial water
that flowed in silver twists between rocks.
He touched my head to bless and said:
Sarayu is for the living, for you.

The Full Moon: A Love Poem

thumbai

After he leaves for the airport
the dust from his shoes settles on the floor

The smell of soap lingers in the room
as I fold the warmth of his body in the  blanket

It goes back to the practice from my childhood
when I wandered in the overgrown backyards of people

to collect the thumbai flowers, pinches of moon in my palm
that  I weaved  into a garland, the pale stem of a flower

pressed into the heart of another, into the soft pouches
of nectar for the bees that helicoptered to my face

Brush of wings a whisper so faint like the slight
movement of his chest as he slept

I pay attention to the small things in him that the others miss
so like the thumbai flower that no one cared to gather.

Who

There was a time we shared our world with animals
swam with horses in the seas, manes covering
our bodies when we pulled along the marina for coitus
muscles tensed, eyes sky blue the colour of our seeds.

I birthed the universe: body the dawn, eyes the sun,
mouth the fire I stoke in my kitchen, spit of grease
thick on foil – offerings made to the gods. They licked
their lips satiated. I am death, hence two faced life.

Half a seed stirring with desire, fathered the other half –
Prajapati, the God, man as in male, my mirror, lover
coiled around me. I shuddered. There was no speech. No
words. Those were times a question became an answer.

Who? Prajapati did not know, so asked. That is him. Who.

Conquest

He is dumb from holding fire in his mouth
and could as well be dead, despite the fire:

not because he has no words,
he will have no kingdom if there is no fire.

The priest knows it, mumbles incantation to Agni,
offers ghee to the potent heat searing the tongue.

What feeds the fire, is it words or ghee,
or the word ghee uttered by the priest?

Fire rolls out of the sealed mouth,
as man to woman, word to desire is wedded.

The word births history, colonizes earth,
marks boundaries and draws maps.

Story softens brutality, so does poetry,
holds god’s attention to syllables and declensions

while the fire scorches the grass. Stubbles of flames
fanned by wind unfurls, licks acres of river plains.

Pathways open as forests are razed and animals burnt –
a blighted day when a word can rule the God of Fire.

_____________
Source: Satapatha Brahmana (700 BCE)

The story of Mathava in Satapatha Brahmana narrates the eastward movement of the Aryan tribe from the banks of River Sarasvati to regions near River Sadanira, present day Ghagara. It is a document of conquest and expansion mythologised in a story.   

Emden

The year of First World War grandfather bought a house
draining his savings, with no inkling if the property was war worthy.

There were rehearsals of black outs – blankets draped on windows,
lights turned off, vegetable oil lamps flickered with frayed hopes.

The night Emden rained projectiles, for half hour Madras held its breath –
breeze carried smell of kerosene from Burma ships into my mother’s sleep.

Grandfather packed his family into a train bound to Mayavaram,
thence to his village. No he would not join them, who will guard the house?

In the village grandmother pulled out the aerial, tuned the radio everyday.
A month later the static crackled with noise, filled the room with glad tidings.

She rejoiced, snapping her knuckles in celebratory anger –
finally that son of a bitch ship has sunk in some distant shore.