Who

There was a time we shared our world with animals
swam with horses in the seas, manes covering
our bodies when we pulled along the marina for coitus
muscles tensed, eyes sky blue the colour of our seeds.

I birthed the universe: body the dawn, eyes the sun,
mouth the fire I stoke in my kitchen, spit of grease
thick on foil – offerings made to the gods. They licked
their lips satiated. I am death, hence two faced life.

Half a seed stirring with desire, fathered the other half –
Prajapati, the God, man as in male, my mirror, lover
coiled around me. I shuddered. There was no speech. No
words. Those were times a question became an answer.

Who? Prajapati did not know, so asked. That is him. Who.

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Conquest

He is dumb from holding fire in his mouth
and could as well be dead, despite the fire:

not because he has no words,
he will have no kingdom if there is no fire.

The priest knows it, mumbles incantation to Agni,
offers ghee to the potent heat searing the tongue.

What feeds the fire, is it words or ghee,
or the word ghee uttered by the priest?

Fire rolls out of the sealed mouth,
as man to woman, word to desire is wedded.

The word births history, colonizes earth,
marks boundaries and draws maps.

Story softens brutality, so does poetry,
holds god’s attention to syllables and declensions

while the fire scorches the grass. Stubbles of flames
fanned by wind unfurls, licks acres of river plains.

Pathways open as forests are razed and animals burnt –
a blighted day when a word can rule the God of Fire.

_____________
Source: Satapatha Brahmana (700 BCE)

The story of Mathava in Satapatha Brahmana narrates the eastward movement of the Aryan tribe from the banks of River Sarasvati to regions near River Sadanira, present day Ghagara. It is a document of conquest and expansion mythologised in a story.   

Emden

The year of First World War grandfather bought a house
draining his savings, with no inkling if the property was war worthy.

There were rehearsals of black outs – blankets draped on windows,
lights turned off, vegetable oil lamps flickered with frayed hopes.

The night Emden rained projectiles, for half hour Madras held its breath –
breeze carried smell of kerosene from Burma ships into my mother’s sleep.

Grandfather packed his family into a train bound to Mayavaram,
thence to his village. No he would not join them, who will guard the house?

In the village grandmother pulled out the aerial, tuned the radio everyday.
A month later the static crackled with noise, filled the room with glad tidings.

She rejoiced, snapping her knuckles in celebratory anger –
finally that son of a bitch ship has sunk in some distant shore.

burial

They folded his legs
curved the spine
gently slid him in
air assumed his shape

His head lolled
pressing into collar bones
in a tight embrace
by the arc of urn

The dog arched its back
howled into darkness
smelling  death it sniffed
him bent like foetus.

Poem A Day

This poem is written in response to visit to a museum in Puhar where burial urns were unearthed. During the Sangam period ( 3 BCE – 4 CE) there were references in literature to burial urns used to intern the dead. They were called the mudhumakkal thazhi, urn for old people. 

Babur in Kabul

The northern wind from the Hindu Kush
set the talisman tied to the doors jangle,
prayers of souls drowned the lake, greened
the meadow. Dead skin from wintry nights

in the cold desert fell away like vermins in
the warm embrace of smoked rhubarb
that filled the air of the hill country,
blue with traces of  silver and lapis lazuli.

Fields stained red with madder roots
spread like shawl of heavens at his feet, but
he sought echoes of different nights,
visions of lands that entombed lost legacies.

Babur in Samarkand

Breeze from the hills blows between walls of mausoleum,
ascends on ribs of blue domed prayers
to wrap him in muteness.

The city carries memories of watercourses that
like veins rumble and knot close to the
heart of the land.

Gardens are young maidens that open their blouse,
bare pomegranates  – a  rash of desire smears an ache
that like a needle pricks him.    

He lays her on the cool mosaic of his colonnade,
the cool stone breathing through the pores in her neck
wrapped in a turquoise band.

City pants in tumescence with sharp cries of battle,  
the young emperor  is the dervish spirited
by his passion for the land.

Babur in Farghana

The clear air crackles over the steppe,
trembles blue of a pool where breast of bird
skims the surface like a sigh.
His tunic is splattered with mud, ropes of hair
fall on eyes turbid like dark lake,
nomadic blood runs like streams that crisscross
the land his ancestors essayed.
Turban laced with sapphires cradles
rinds of melons from Farghana country.
He reads the horizon as he would a poem,
counts the rolls of hills fading purple at distance;
considers he’ll pitch his kingdom where blue
gets ashen grey.